FREE DEER HUNTING SEMINAR THIS MONTH

 

PROVIDENCE -The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) today announced it is hosting a free informational seminar on deer hunting this month. The program is designed to educate hunters of all ages and experience on ways to increase their success hunting whitetail deer. 

 

WHEN:      Saturday, August 26| 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

                   

WHERE:     DEM Division of Fish & Wildlife Education Center, 1-B Camp E-Hun-Tee Place, Exeter

 

The workshop is open to the public and will include classroom and field activities.  Participants will learn about where to hunt, clothing and equipment, practicing for success, tree stand tips, scouting, calls and calling, reading signs, animal recovery techniques, and field dressing tips. The session will be led by hunter education instructors from DEM’s Division of Fish & Wildlife. The program will be held rain or shine, and appropriate dress for weather conditions is suggested. Participants are encouraged to bring their own lunch, snacks, and beverages.  Space is limited and registration is required. For more information or to register, contact Jessica Pena in the DEM Division of Fish & Wildlife at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Deer hunting has a long tradition in Rhode Island, supporting family customs and tourism to the state.  According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, hunting contributes more than $18 million annually to Rhode Island’s economy.  There are approximately 17,000 licensed hunters in Rhode Island.  Hunter education is offered as part of DEM Division of Fish & Wildlife’s Hunter Education Program.  Safety training is required by law in Rhode Island for beginning hunters. To date, more than 40,000 people have completed a hunter safety course in Rhode Island, helping to dramatically reduce related accidents in the state and elsewhere.  A complete schedule of hunter educational offerings is available at www.dem.ri.gov

 

Follow DEM on Twitter (@RhodeIslandDEM) or Facebook at www.facebook.com/RhodeIslandDEM for timely updates.

 

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