RI Legislative Black and Latino Caucus Seeks Prioritized Access to COVID-19 Vaccine for Communities of Color

 

STATE HOUSE – The Rhode Island Legislative Black and Latino Caucus is calling on Governor Raimondo and the COVID-19 Vaccine Subcommittee to prioritize access to the COVID-19 vaccine for Rhode Island’s communities of color and high-density populations which have been the state’s hardest-hit populations by the virus.

“As the data has revealed consistently since the beginning of the pandemic, Rhode Island’s community of color and those living in high-density settings have been the most affected by this deadly virus.  Whether we are speaking about the essential workers who have continued to serve the public, even at great risk to themselves or families, or individuals living in tight spaces where the opportunity to properly quarantine is impossible, we must protect these populations that are struggling immensely.  This will only be possible if the state’s community of color and those living in the most-affected areas are prioritized to receive this game-changing vaccine as soon as possible,” said Rep. Jean Philippe Barros, chairman of the caucus (D-Dist. 59, Pawtucket).

The other members of the caucus are Rep. Marvin L. Abney (D-Dist 73, Newport, Middletown); Rep. Joseph S. Almeida (D-Dis. 12, Providence); Rep. Karen Alzate (D-Dist. 60, Pawtucket); Rep. Liana Cassar (D-Dist. 66, Barrington, East Providence); Rep. Grace Diaz (D-Dist. 11, Providence); Rep. Joshua Giraldo (D-Dist. 56, Central Falls), Rep. Raymond A. Hull (D-Dist. 6, Providence, North Providence); Rep. Mario F. Mendez (D-Dist. 13, Johnston, Providence); Rep. Marcia Ranglin-Vassell (D-Dist. 5, Providence); Rep. Carlos E. Tobon (D-Dist. 58, Pawtucket); Rep. Anastasia P. Williams (D-Dist. 9, Providence); Sen. Sandra Cano (D-Dist. 8, Pawtucket); Sen. Harold M. Metts (D-Dist. 6, Providence); and Sen. Ana B. Quezada (D-Dist. 2, Providence).

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