Free Screening of The Color of Care and Panel With RI Health Care Leaders

 

Smithsonian Channel Documentary and Discussion With Local Experts 

 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Join the Rhode Island Historical Society and the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University on Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 5:30 p.m., for a screening of the Smithsonian Channel documentary The Color of Care, followed by a panel discussion featuring leaders from Rhode Island’s health care community.

 

The Color of Care chronicles how people of color suffer from systemically substandard health care. COVID-19 exposed what they have long understood and lived: they do not receive the same level of care. Produced by Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Productions and directed by Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning director Yance Ford, the film traces the origins of racial health disparities to practices that began during slavery and continue today. Using moving personal testimony, expert interviews and disturbing data, the film reveals the impact of racism on health, serving as an urgent warning of what must be done to save lives.

Following the screening, local health care leaders will offer insight into health care in Rhode Island. The panel will be moderated by Patricia Poitevien, MD, senior associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion at the Warren Alpert Medical School. Panelists include Joseph A. Diaz, MD, MPH, associate dean for multicultural affairs and associate professor of medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School, and Anais Ovalle, MD, infectious disease specialist and director, Population Health Track, Care New England.

Tickets are free, but registration is required at rihs.org.

 

This screening is part of the Rhode Island Historical Society’s Bicentennial Celebrations, sponsored by Amica Insurance.

 

Remember Bid on the Phone but watch here:  LIVE on O-N TV

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