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W    hat: Ciné Québec 2018

When: Thursday, March 8, 6pm

Where: Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket, RI 02895


MoWC’s Ciné Québec to Pick Official Entry for 2018 R.I. International Film Festival

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture invites the public to an upcoming event that will help curate the 2018 Flickers’ Rhode Island International Film Festival.


Ciné Québec, an evening of Québecois films in celebration of the month of Francophonie, takes place Thursday, March 8, at the MoWC. The evening will begin at 6pm with a wine and cheese reception in the MoWC gallery.


At 7pm, attendees will watch and vote on new and exciting short films from Québec currently under consideration by RIIFF. The film that wins the most votes will gain automatic competition entry to the festival.


Ciné Québec will conclude with a screening of the feature-length documentary Quebec My Country Mon Pays (pictured above).

The film charts the aftermath of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution in the 1960s. This social justice movement unleashed dramatic cultural and political changes that led to the separatist movement, the FLQ terrorist crisis and, ultimately, the exodus of more than 500,000 English-speaking Quebecers. Montreal-born filmmaker John Walker reveals his own complicated relationship with the province in a film brimming with love and longing. He explores a very personal story through the lens of a cast of characters including three generations of his family, childhood confidantes and artistic contemporaries. In a quest to make sense of a divisive and transformative time in Quebec’s evolution, they each wrestle with their memories, their decisions and the continuing reverberations.


Tickets are $15 and may be reserved by calling (401) 769-9675 or purchased at


This event is made possible by the Délegation of Québec in Boston.


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About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.


About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization, as well as its only Smithsonian Affiliate. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book, and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.